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Harvard Scholar / Amos Jones

Amos N. Jones

Visiting Scholar, University of Melbourne Law School

Amos Jones in Australia

AMOS N. JONES is a Washington, D.C., attorney who recently served for nine months as a Fulbright Postgraduate Scholar and Visitor to the Faculty of Law at the University of Melbourne’s Centre for Comparative Constitutional Studies.  He analyzed the influence of political culture upon the legal development of the Bill of Rights and collateral social allowances proposed for Australia.  In addition to lecturing and speaking, Jones served as a Residential Tutor in Whitley College, the Baptist College of Victoria, while writing his occasional column in the Harvard Law Record.
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Jones’s scholarship focuses on the law of racial discrimination, the development of international human rights, and the role of religion in lawmaking. He has advised legal practitioner-scholars in the Republic of Georgia on liberty provisions of that country’s constitution drafted after the Rose Revolution of 2003. Jones’s recent publications include: Crimes of the Holocaust, an international law book note at 19 HARV. HUM. RTS. J. 299 (2006); The Ghosts of Ward’s Cove, an employment-discrimination article at 21 HARV. BLACKLETTER L.J. 163 (2005) (D. Alexander Ewing, co-author); and Black Like Obama, a constitutional law essay at 31 T. MARSHALL L. REV. 79 (2005). Jones’s recent publications include Setting Aside the Will of the Plaintiffs, a professional-responsibility article at 23 GA. ST. U. L. REV. 289 (2006), and Egypt’s Competitive Liberalization in Services: Bilateral, Regional, and Multilateral, an international-trade article (co-authored with Professor Mohamed Hassanien) in 16 CURRENTS INT’L TRADE L. J. (2007).

In 2006 Jones earned the Juris Doctor degree from Harvard University, where he served as an Executive Editor of the Harvard Human Rights Journal and the Harvard BlackLetter Law Journal and was a Columnist for the Harvard Law Record. In Cambridge he also served as a Research Assistant for Professors Lani Guinier, Charles Ogletree, and Kenneth Mack and as a fund-raiser among alumni for the Harvard Law School Fund, a five-year, $400 million capital campaign. Jones spent his law-school summers in large, international firm settings in Washington, D.C., and New York City, concentrating in International Trade Regulation, Labor/Employment Litigation, and Public Law and Policy Strategies.

In 2003 Jones earned the Master of Science from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, where he served as President of the Columbia Journalism Guild and Resident Trustee on International House New York’s board. Before entering graduate school, he worked as a journalist in the southeastern United States for Pulitzer Prize-winning newspapers of the New York Times Company, Cox Newspapers, and Knight Ridder, all Fortune 500 publishing companies. While working as a News Copy Editor for The Charlotte Observer in 2000-01, Jones also was a Staff Violist in the North Carolina city’s fully professional Charlotte Philharmonic Orchestra.

Jones earned the Bachelor of Arts cum laude in political science from Emory University in Atlanta, which he attended on the full, academic merit-based Woodruff Scholarship and where he was awarded the Burt and Betty Schear Family Prize as the Emory undergraduate “most likely to make a uniquely positive impact on his or her universe.” USA Today placed Jones on the national newspaper’s Year 2000 All-USA College Academic First Team, ranking him as one of the twenty most outstanding college students in America. He is a 1999 Harry S. Truman Scholar, carrying a distinction conferred annually by the federal government upon not more than eighty-five college juniors in recognition of leadership potential. In July 2000, he addressed 1,000 delegates at the Southeastern Jurisdictional Conference of the United Methodist Church, affirming the denomination’s historical relationship with Emory University. He served as an American Honors Student Delegate to the Academy of Achievement’s October 2000 summit in London, England, which culminated in the Banquet of the Golden Plate at Hampton Court Palace.

Jones is a native of Lexington, Kentucky, where in 1996 he received the Commonwealth Diploma and was named a National Merit Scholar at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School. On January 17, 2006, he returned to his home state to deliver the first offering in the Christian Vocation & Public Life lecture series at Georgetown College, a Baptist-affiliated liberal arts institution chartered in 1829.

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